RESEARCH

CLET is Uganda’s premier research centre for law and emerging technology. Our faculty and students conduct cross-disciplinary research on how law and technology relate with governance, security, health, human rights, the economy, and more.

Areas of Interest

Research at CLET

CLET brings together researchers and practitioners interested in deepening their knowledge or investigating previously unexplored questions on law and emerging technology. Our faculty facilitates collaborative undertakings that work towards making a contextually relevant contribution to the conversations on the impact of frontier technologies on the law and society.

As part of our process of stimulating contextually relevant policy interventions and approaches to the questions we are interested in, we work with small cohorts of students to produce robust research on our areas of thematic focus.

Our inaugural cohort of researchers comprises of seven students working on our first series of working papers covering specific questions on artificial intelligence; big data, health information and policy; big data and national identification systems; data governance, politics and multinational corporations; taxation of digital assets; regulatory concerns around blockchain technology; and the legal and policy issues on the use of unmanned autonomous weapons.

Ongoing and future research at the Centre covers key broad and themes incuding governance, health, security, the economy and human rights.

Cras est Lex (Tomorrow’s Laws)

The current legal design has enough room to address only a limited number of the questions emerging with the development of next frontier technologies. CLET is keen on stimulating the necessary conversations focused on guiding the search for a Legal Design for the Fourth industrial revolution. We will host our first lecture in this series soon.

Law Elections and Politics

The impact of technology on elections is now well documented. However, there are not enough answers to the underlying questions. This is a critical area of interest to our researchers and our work focuses on providing those much needed answers.

Clusters and Hangouts

From the earlier days of its conceptualization, the law has always evolved from conversation and debate. Our clusters and hangouts provide spaces for collaborative discussion, healthy and penetrative debate, and policy and scholarly incubation of varying kinds and that addresses different levels of interest. We emphasize to both industry and students how crucial it is that the thought process is philosophical and theoretical as it is practical.

Humans 4.0 Initiative

Beyond blurring the lines between our interactions with technology and our environments, frontier technologies are altering what it means to be human. Our research examines the various policy, social welfare, human rights, and other dimensional issues that the law must, as a matter of urgency address.

Student Driven Initiatives

Our student driven initiatives provide room for our students to initiate and incubate ideas, projects and solutions to individual human, societal and business needs that they identify. We lend them support in facilitating the structuring of critical relationships, without superintending their creativity. These initiatives prove that lawyers are as creative as their industry counterparts. These spaces also facilitate the building of relationships between students of different colleges and law students, and allow them to co-create the ecosystems of the future.

  • Research at CLET

    CLET brings together researchers and practitioners interested in deepening their knowledge or investigating previously unexplored questions on law and emerging technology. Our faculty facilitates collaborative undertakings that work towards making a contextually relevant contribution to the conversations on the impact of frontier technologies on the law and society.

    As part of our process of stimulating contextually relevant policy interventions and approaches to the questions we are interested in, we work with small cohorts of students to produce robust research on our areas of thematic focus.

    Our inaugural cohort of researchers comprises of seven students working on our first series of working papers covering specific questions on artificial intelligence; big data, health information and policy; big data and national identification systems; data governance, politics and multinational corporations; taxation of digital assets; regulatory concerns around blockchain technology; and the legal and policy issues on the use of unmanned autonomous weapons.

    Ongoing and future research at the Centre covers key broad and themes incuding governance, health, security, the economy and human rights.

  • From the earlier days of its conceptualization, the law has always evolved from conversation and debate. Our clusters and hangouts provide spaces for collaborative discussion, healthy and penetrative debate, and policy and scholarly incubation of varying kinds and that addresses different levels of interest. We emphasize to both industry and students how crucial it is that the thought process is philosophical and theoretical as it is practical.

  • The current legal design has enough room to address only a limited number of the questions emerging with the development of next frontier technologies. CLET is keen on stimulating the necessary conversations focused on guiding the search for a Legal Design for the Fourth industrial revolution. We will host our first lecture in this series soon.

  • The impact of technology on elections is now well documented. However, there are not enough answers to the underlying questions. This is a critical area of interest to our researchers and our work focuses on providing those much needed answers.

  • Beyond blurring the lines between our interactions with technology and our environments, frontier technologies are altering what it means to be human. Our research examines the various policy, social welfare, human rights, and other dimensional issues that the law must, as a matter of urgency address.

  • The impact of technology on elections is now well documented. However, there are not enough answers to the underlying questions. This is a critical area of interest to our researchers and our work focuses on providing those much needed answers.